Feeling Too Hot Or Too Cold? It’s Time To Test Your Thyroid

Has your body been acting super sensitive to minor fluctuations in temperature? Does a light summer breeze give you chills? Do you sweat profusely when you step out into the sun even though it isn’t too hot outside? Maybe you find that of all the people on your office floor, you’re the only one wearing a muffler, jacket and/or cap indoors. If you’ve been facing similar situations and don’t know why they’re happening, it’s time to make an appointment with your doctor for a test that checks your thyroid function. That’s because the hormones produced by your thyroid gland help regulate how hot or cold you feel.Has your body been acting super sensitive to minor fluctuations in temperature? Does a light summer breeze give you chills? Do you sweat profusely when you step out into the sun even though it isn’t too hot outside? Maybe you find that of all the people on your office floor, you’re the only one wearing a muffler, jacket and/or cap indoors. If you’ve been facing similar situations and don’t know why they’re happening, it’s time to make an appointment with your doctor for a test that checks your thyroid function. That’s because the hormones produced by your thyroid gland help regulate how hot or cold you feel.

Why Does This Happen?

The human thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ located in the throat. It releases two hormones—thyroxine and triiodothyronine. These hormones determine the way your body uses the energy derived from the food you eat. Heat is nothing but energy, which has been released instead of getting absorbed. Thyroid hormones play an important role in balancing this release of energy as heat. This balancing act keeps your body temperature constant even if the temperature of the environment fluctuates.

What Makes Cold/Heat Intolerance a Symptom of Malfunctioning Thyroid?

Too little thyroid hormone: Most of the heat generated to regulate body temperature comes during the synthesis of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or the “energy currency” of the body. Less thyroid hormone means lesser synthesis of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which means less energy for our body to trade with. This is why individuals with hypothyroidism can’t raise their body temperature as quickly or efficiently as people without hypothyroidism. They also risk contracting hypothermia if exposed to extremely cold environments. Some other symptoms of hypothyroidism to look out for are:

  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty in focusing
  • Dry skin
  • Weight gain and poor appetite
  • Constipation
  • Trouble staying awake

Too much thyroid hormone: When the rate of ATP synthesis goes up, the amount of heat being generated by the body goes up too. Individuals with hyperthyroidism have low heat tolerance because they are already generating a surplus of heat. Other symptoms to look out for include: • Nervousness and anxiousness• Sweating• Weight loss and increased appetite• Frequent bowel movements• InsomniaIf you are experiencing any of the symptoms above, get yourself tested for thyroid-related issues. Your doctor may prescribe a test that measures the level of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) in your blood. TSH is secreted by the pituitary gland to stimulate the secretion of thyroid hormones. Elevated TSH levels indicate hypothyroidism and low TSH levels indicate hyperthyroidism.

Sepalika Editorial

Sepalika Editorial

The Sepalika Editorial team does extensive research on every topic published on the website. The team has several decades of experience in health care and uses this to sift through the available research and bring you the most authentic, usable information.

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This article is intended for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Sepalika.com strongly recommends that you consult a medical practitioner for implementing any of the above. Results may vary from person to person.

Silva, J. E. (2003). The Thermogenic Effect of Thyroid Hormone and Its Clinical Implications. Annals of Internal Medicine, 139: 205-213.

Simmons, S. (2010). A delicate balance: Detecting thyroid disease. Nursing, 40(7): 22-29.

 

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